Tuesday, May 3, 2011

Neutral, or Intense?



I am trying to decide on the palette for Book Four's styling, and I've hit a bit of a wall. I was sort of hoping that some of you out there in blog-land would be willing to offer up your opinions. Currently, all the designer colors are chosen and perfect. In order to show you the theme without giving it away, I didn't pull color card images but instead captured the 'ideal' color card the designers were given to work off of. As you can see, it's a fairly dark and moody palette, and I want to balance it out in the book one of two ways. Either by making all of the garments stand out by putting them against a background that is neutral, or by intensifying them and making each page of the book an explosion of color. I've put together a little grouping to help you all visualize this with me.


Here are images that I feel summarize the 'neutral' feel -- imagine them with pops of the colors in the palette. All of the colors would be paired with ensembles that would be cream, beige, brown, gray, with plenty of texture. The lighting would be bright and detailed.


In contrast, here are images I feel summarize the feel of intensity and moodiness. I feel like this is more the direction I would like the book to go, but I don't want to alienate the reason for a knitting book's pictures -- illustration of the final product -- from the images themselves.


Which images do you think would highlight the patterns better, and which do you feel would make you want to buy a book? More importantly, how do the pictures weigh with your potential purchase of said book?

13 comments:

  1. I'd go for the second, color. I think Malabrigo's strong point, except from soft wool, is bright, vibrant and deep colors.

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  2. I think intense colors appeal more to my personal palette. Regardless of the amount of texture the "neutral" backgrounds and outfits would have, I think they're a bit blah and wouldn't appeal to me. Photographs really do affect whether or not I'll buy a book. For example, even if I never intended to knit a single thing from it, the photographs in Cookie A's new book Knit.Sock.Love. were enough to make me buy it and treasure it. Hope this helps!

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  3. I really like the neutral palette. It allows the highlighted item to be the focus of the image. For me, the photography of a pattern weighs heavily in my decision to knit it.

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  4. I like intense colours, and that's one of the things I love most about Malabrigo, you never get dull yarn :-) This being said, the second idea would make it more of a fashion book, while the first one would protrait the patterns better... much more in a traditional knitter's point of view. Show me how I can knit and be fashionable and you win me... so I'd go for the secondd
    Anna Chiara - knittingchiara on Ravelry

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  5. Intense, for many reasons, but I think the most important point is the one Archangel already made: color is what Malabrigo does like no one else, and highlighting that is important. I also feel like very often knitting books avoid the bright, intense colors, and I get it, but one of the things I love about knitting is that we have the option of using these exciting colors we may not be able to get off the rack.

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  6. Several people have said that what they like about the Mal is the color - that's why I'd go for the neutral background...let the yarn sing and not fight with the rest of the background...if you just want a coffee table book then go lush all around - if you want to highlight the yarn (and the patterns) then let them have the high notes...just my 2 cts. Cheers...

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  7. I think the more intense colors is the way to go with Malabrigo. They are so vivid and it speaks more to their wonderful colors. I think the neutrals are too subtle and I don't think of Malabrigo as subtle.

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  8. I'd go for the first one as i feel it shows off the patterns and yarns better. The 2nd option seems a bit cluttered and im not sure where to place my focus.

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  9. I'm also in the 'intense color' camp. While the neutral palette is lovely, I'm really with the others in showing just how gorgeous the Malabrigo colors are. I feel a lot of people can be afraid of color and when they knit, they knit exactly what they see in the pattern picture -- it would be nice to see a book which features gorgeous knits and intense colors to show them that color is nothing to be afraid of! :)

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  10. It's important for the knitter to really be able to see the item in question, I think the 'intense' option looks fantastic and think it would display Malabrigo's diverse color palette!

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  11. Personally, I think Malabrigo is an easy sell in any color... but it's harder to sell a neutral shade than a vibrant shade. As someone that wears a lot of neutral colors (I gift in vibrant colors), the beauty of Malabrigo is in both camps. I favor neutral and love that my favorite fiber does it so well, but realize that selling it takes "POP."

    How's that for a non-answer?
    ... Neutral, with strong leaning towards vibrant ...

    QAGeek@Ravelry / Mal Junkies

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  12. Well my personal favourite right now is for the neutral palette, but I am loving the intensity of the vibrant palette too. Either direction would get my vote and my dollars. When I think of Mal, I think of a gorgeous array of colours, so I guess it makes sense to go for vibrance over softness.

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  13. There are two important questions, in my mind:
    1) when will the book be released? if it's fall/winter, I think neutral as those seasons seem more mellow and any color will "pop" on it's own. In spring/summer, with the sensory overload occuring, i think the explosion of colors will compete.
    2) Are the designs new takes on tried and true wares or edgy, modern pieces? If they are tried and true, people drawn to those patterns would likely be turned off by color overload and miss the patterns. the color may overwhelm the FOs as well. But if you are doing something edgy (reversible knits is the book that comes to mind to explain what i'm thinking) than the color explosion will excite the audience that would want to knit edgy pieces. of course, some people might think that edgy pieces in a bright background would be too overwhelming, but I don't think so.

    hopefully, the answer isn't a fall/winter release of edgy patterns as my thoughts would then be in conflict with each other. if that happens, I might let season dictate the final choice.

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